Dandelion Trilogy

by Mike French

Dandelion trilogy spines

Literary surrealism, contemporary fantasy, biting satire, dystopian science fiction. The Dandelion Trilogy by Mike French is all of these and more. Starting with The Ascent of Isaac Steward, this is literary surrealism at its most profound. A contemporary fantasy that follows one man’s journey into his own mind as he struggles to come to terms with the trauma that has reshaped his life and starts to question his own existence. Moving forward to 2034 in Blue Friday, this biting satire warns of a Britain where overtime for married couples is banned, there is enforced viewing of family television (much of it repeats of old shows from the sixties and seventies), monitored family meal-times and a coming of age where twenty-five year-olds are automatically assigned a spouse by the state computer if they have failed to marry. Only the Overtime Underground network resists with the illicit Avodah drug to increase productivity. Finally Convergence delivers us into a truly dystopian future, where a covert military/governmental project uses prisoners on death row to explore what happens to people as they die, downloading the Convergence Point formed in the brain’s memory at the point of death into clones. But when combined with Avodah they inadvertently trigger what may be the end of humanity – or a new beginning.

What does it have to do with dandelions? You’ll have to read it to find out…


The first book The Ascent of Isaac Steward was re-published by Elsewhen Press in April 2013.

The Ascent of Isaac Steward

Book 1 of the Dandelion Trilogy

The Ascent of Isaac Steward cover image

Artwork: Alison Buck

Literary surrealism at its most profound, The Ascent of Isaac Steward follows one man’s journey into his own mind as he struggles to come to terms with the trauma that has reshaped his life.

A year on from the car crash in which his wife Rebekah and son Esau were killed and his other son Jacob left in a coma, Isaac Steward has suppressed every memory of that fateful day. Yet fate seems determined to make him remember, driving Isaac deeper and deeper into himself. Slowly, dysfunction builds on delusion, as childhood memories compete with a persona he has fabricated to regress to an earlier, happier time. Violence, death and destruction result as Isaac gradually loses his grip on reality. His half-brother Ishmael tells him that he must return to the wood at his childhood home, to a tree he called The Dandelion Tree, if he is ever to be reunited with Rebekah. But as he descends further, he starts to question his own existence.

Read more…


The second book Blue Friday was published by Elsewhen Press in September 2012.

Blue Friday

Book 2 of the Dandelion Trilogy

Blue Friday cover image

Artwork: Alison Buck

In the Britain of 2034 overtime for married couples is banned, there is enforced viewing of family television (much of it repeats of old shows from the sixties and seventies), monitored family meal-times and a coming of age where twenty-five year-olds are automatically assigned a spouse by the state computer if they have failed to marry. Only the Overtime Underground network resists.

Read more…


The third book Convergence was published by Elsewhen Press in October 2013.

Convergence

Book 3 of the Dandelion Trilogy

Convergence cover image

Artwork: Alison Buck
Astronaut: 315 Studio / shutterstock.com

The Convergence Project is a covert military/governmental science project that uses prisoners on death row to explore what happens to people as they die.

The experience of life flashing before your eyes just before death is a process called active retrieval where memories are being recalled and lived out again in the mind. As the amount of time before death decreases, the brain exponentially increases the speed of playback and starts looping: repeating over and over a lifetime’s worth of memories. Each playback making the memories stronger, retaining more detail. Finally the memories are replayed over and over in an infinitesimally small amount of time just before death to form a memory singularity called a Convergence Point.

Read more…

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